IMEKO Joint Symposium in St. Petersburg, Russia, 2-5 July 2019

The IMEKO Joint Symposium will be next week, 2-5 July, at the Original Sokos Hotel Olympia Garden, located at Batayskiy Pereulok, 3А, in St. Petersburg, Russia. Kudos to Kseniia Sapozhnikova, Giovanni Rossi, Eric Benoit, and the organizing committee for putting together such an impressive program, which is posted at: https://imeko19-spb.org/wp-content/uploads/2019/06/Program-of-the-Symposium.pdf

Presentations on measurement across the sciences from metrology engineers and psychometricians from around the world will include: Andrich, Cavanagh, Fitkov-Norris, Huang, Mari, Melin, Nguyen, Oon, Powers, Salzberger, Wilson, and multiple other co-authors, including Adams, Cano, Maul, Pendrill, and more.

For background on this rapidly developing new conversation on measurement across the sciences, see the references listed at bottom below. The late Ludwig Finkelstein, editor of IMEKO’s Measurement journal from 1982 to 2000, was a primary instigator of work in this area. At the 2010 Joint Symposium he co-hosted in London, Finkelstein said: “It is increasingly recognised that the wide range and diverse applications of measurement are based on common logical and philosophical principles and share common problems” (Finkelstein, 2010, p. 2). The IMEKO Joint Symposium continues to advance in the direction foreseen by Finkelstein.

Topics to be addressed include a round table discussion on the topic “Terminology issues related to expanding boundaries of measurements” chaired by Mari and Chunovkina.

Paper titles include:

Andrich on “Exemplifying natural science measurement in the social sciences with Rasch measurement theory”

Benoit, et al. on “Musical instruments for the measurement of autism sensory disorders”

Budylina and Danilov on “Methods to ensure the reliability of measurements in the age of Industry 4.0”

Cavanagh, Asano-Cavanagh, and Fisher on “Natural semantic metalanguage as an approach to measuring meaning”

Crenna and Rossi on “Squat biomechanics in weightlifting: Foot attitude effects”

Fisher, Pendrill, Lips da Cruz, and Felin on “Why metrology? Fair dealing and efficient markets for the UN SDGs”

Fisher and Wilson on “The BEAR Assessment System Software as a platform for developing and applying UN SDG metrics”

Fitkov-Norris and Yeghiazarian on “Is context the hidden spanner in the works of educational measurement: Exploring the impact of context on mode of learning preferences”

Gavrilenkov, et al. on “Multicriteria approach to design of strain gauge force transducers”

Grednovskaya, et al. on “Measuring non-physical quantities in the procedures of philosophical practice”

Huang, Oon, and Fisher on “Coherence in measuring student evaluation of teaching: A new paradigm”

Katkov on “The status of and prospects for development of voltage quantum standards”

Kneller and Fayans on “Solving interdisciplinary tasks: The challenge and the ways to surmount it”

Kostromina and Gnedykh on “Problems and prospects of complex psychological phenomena measurement”

Lips da Cruz, Fisher, Pendrill, and Felin on “Accelerating the realization of the UN SDGs through metrological multi-stakeholder interoperability”

Lyubimtsev, et al. on “Measuring systems designed for working with living organisms as biosensors: Features of their metrological maintenance”

Mari, Chunovkina, and Ehrlich on “The complex concept of quantity in the past and (possibly) the future of the International Vocabulary of Metrology”

Mari, Maul, and Wilson on “Can there be one meaning of ‘measurement’ across the sciences?”

Melin, Pendrill, Cano, and the EMPIR NeuroMET 15HLT04 Consortium on “Towards patient-centred cognition metrics”

Morrison and Fisher on “Measuring for management in Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics learning ecosystems”

Nguyen on “The feasibility of using an international common reading progression to measure reading across languages: A case study of the Vietnamese language”

Nguyen, Nguyen, and Adams on “Assessment of the generic problem-solving construct across different contexts”

Oon, Hoi-Ka, and Fisher on “Metrologically coherent assessment for learning: What, why, and how”

Pandurevic, et al. on “Methods for quantitative evaluation of force and technique in competitive sport climbing”

Pavese on “Musing on extreme quantity values in physics and the problem of removing infinity”

Powers and Fisher on “Advances in modelling visual symptoms and visual skills”

Salzberger, Cano, et al. on “Addressing traceability in social measurement: Establishing a common metric for dependence”

Sapozhnikova, et al. on “Music and growl of a lion: Anything in common? Measurement model optimized with the help of AI will answer”

Soratto, Nunes, and Cassol on “Legal metrological verification in health area in Brazil”

Wilson and Dulhunty on “Interpreting the relationship between item difficulty and DIF: Examples from educational testing”

Wilson, Mari, and Maul on “The status of the concept of reference object in measurement in the human sciences compared to the physical sciences”

Background References

Finkelstein, L. (1975). Representation by symbol systems as an extension of the concept of measurement. Kybernetes, 4(4), 215-223.Finkelstein, L. (2003, July). Widely, strongly and weakly defined measurement. Measurement, 34(1), 39-48(10).

Finkelstein, L. (2005). Problems of measurement in soft systems. Measurement, 38(4), 267-274.

Finkelstein, L. (2009). Widely-defined measurement–An analysis of challenges. Measurement: Concerning Foundational Concepts of Measurement Special Issue Section (L. Finkelstein, Ed.), 42(9), 1270-1277.

Finkelstein, L. (2010). Measurement and instrumentation science and technology-the educational challenges. Journal of Physics Conference Series, 238, doi:10.1088/1742-6596/238/1/012001.

Fisher, W. P., Jr. (2009). Invariance and traceability for measures of human, social, and natural capital: Theory and application. Measurement: Concerning Foundational Concepts of Measurement Special Issue (L. Finkelstein, Ed.), 42(9), 1278-1287.

Mari, L. (2000). Beyond the representational viewpoint: A new formalization of measurement. Measurement, 27, 71-84.

Mari, L., Maul, A., Irribara, D. T., & Wilson, M. (2016, March). Quantities, quantification, and the necessary and sufficient conditions for measurement. Measurement, 100, 115-121. Retrieved from http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0263224116307497

Mari, L., & Wilson, M. (2014, May). An introduction to the Rasch measurement approach for metrologists. Measurement, 51, 315-327. Retrieved from http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0263224114000645

Pendrill, L. (2014, December). Man as a measurement instrument [Special Feature]. NCSLi Measure: The Journal of Measurement Science, 9(4), 22-33. Retrieved from http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/abs/10.1080/19315775.2014.11721702

Pendrill, L., & Fisher, W. P., Jr. (2015). Counting and quantification: Comparing psychometric and metrological perspectives on visual perceptions of number. Measurement, 71, 46-55. doi: http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.measurement.2015.04.010

Pendrill, L., & Petersson, N. (2016). Metrology of human-based and other qualitative measurements. Measurement Science and Technology, 27(9), 094003. Retrieved from https://doi.org/10.1088/0957-0233/27/9/094003

Wilson, M. R. (2013). Using the concept of a measurement system to characterize measurement models used in psychometrics. Measurement, 46, 3766-3774. Retrieved from http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0263224113001061

Wilson, M., & Fisher, W. (2016). Preface: 2016 IMEKO TC1-TC7-TC13 Joint Symposium: Metrology across the Sciences: Wishful Thinking? Journal of Physics Conference Series, 772(1), 011001. Retrieved from http://iopscience.iop.org/article/10.1088/1742-6596/772/1/011001/pdf

Wilson, M., & Fisher, W. (2018). Preface of special issue, Metrology across the Sciences: Wishful Thinking? Measurement, 127, 577.

Wilson, M., & Fisher, W. (2019). Preface of special issue, Psychometric Metrology. Measurement, 145, 190.

 

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