Excellent articulation of the rationale for living capital metrics 

I just found the best analysis of today’s situation I’ve seen yet. And it explicitly articulates and substantiates all my reasons for doing the work I’m doing. Wonderful to have this independent source of validation.

The crux of the problem is spelled out at the end of the article, where the degree of polarizing opposition is so extreme that standards of truth and evidence are completely compromised. My point is that the fact will remain, however, that everyone still uses language, and language still requires certain connections between concepts, words, and things to function. Continuing to use language in everyday functions in ways that assume a common consensus on meaningful reference may eventually come to be unbearably inconsistent with the way language is used politically, creating a social vacuum that will be filled by a new language capable of restoring the balance of meaning in the word-concept-thing triangles.

As is repeatedly argued in this blog, my take is that what we are witnessing is language restructuring itself to incorporate new degrees of complexity at a general institutional, world historic level. The falsehoods of our contemporary institutional definitions of truth and fact are rooted in the insufficiencies of the decision making methods and tools widely used in education, health care, government, business, etc. The numbers called measures are identified using methods that almost universally ignore the gifts of self-organized meaning that offer themselves in the structure of test, assessment, survey, poll, and evaluation response data. Those shortcomings in our information infrastructure and communication systems are causing negative feedback loops of increasingly chaotic noise.

This is why it is so important that precision science is rooted in everyday language and thinking, per Nersessian’s (2002) treatment of Maxwell and Rasch’s (1960, pp. 110-115) adoption of Maxwell’s method of analogy (Fisher, 2010; Fisher & Stenner, 2013). The metric system (System International des Unites, or SI) is a natural language extension of intuitive and historical methods of bringing together words, concepts, and things, renamed instruments, theories, and data. A new SI for human, social, and natural capital built out into science and commerce will be one component of a multilevel and complex adaptive system that resolves today’s epistemic crisis by tapping deeper resources for the creation of meaning than are available in today’s institutions.

Everything is interrelated. The epistemic crisis will be resolved when our institutions base decisions not just on a potentially arbitrary collection of facts but on facts internally consistent enough to support instrument calibration and predictive theory. The facts have to be common sensical to everyday people, to employees, customers, teachers, students, patients, doctors, nurses, managers. People have to be able to see themselves and where they stand relative to their goals, their origins, and everyone else in the pictures drawn by the results of tests, surveys, and evaluations. That’s not possible in today’s systems. And in those systems, some people have systematically unfair advantages. That has to change, not through some kind of Brave New World hobbling of those with advantages but by leveling the playing field to allow everyone the same opportunities for self-improvement and the rewards that follow from it.

That’s it in a nutshell. Really good article:

America is facing an epistemic crisis – Vox

https://apple.news/A0alOElOQT5itYGPAJ3eYPQ

References

Fisher, W. P., Jr. (2010, June 13-16). Rasch, Maxwell’s method of analogy, and the Chicago tradition. In G. Cooper (Chair), Https://conference.cbs.dk/index.php/rasch/Rasch2010/paper/view/824. Probabilistic models for measurement in education, psychology, social science and health: Celebrating 50 years since the publication of Rasch’s Probabilistic Models, University of Copenhagen School of Business, FUHU Conference Centre, Copenhagen, Denmark.

Fisher, W. P., Jr. (2010). The standard model in the history of the natural sciences, econometrics, and the social sciences. Journal of Physics Conference Series, 238(1), http://iopscience.iop.org/1742-6596/238/1/012016/pdf/1742-6596_238_1_012016.pdf.

Fisher, W. P., Jr., & Stenner, A. J. (2013). On the potential for improved measurement in the human and social sciences. In Q. Zhang & H. Yang (Eds.), Pacific Rim Objective Measurement Symposium 2012 Conference Proceedings (pp. 1-11). Berlin, Germany: Springer-Verlag.

Nersessian, N. J. (2002). Maxwell and “the method of physical analogy”: Model-based reasoning, generic abstraction, and conceptual change. In D. Malament (Ed.), Reading natural philosophy: Essays in the history and philosophy of science and mathematics (pp. 129-166). Lasalle, Illinois: Open Court.

Rasch, G. (1960). Probabilistic models for some intelligence and attainment tests (Reprint, with Foreword and Afterword by B. D. Wright, Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 1980). Copenhagen, Denmark: Danmarks Paedogogiske Institut.

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